How to Resize Images

When submitting to an exhibition, make sure to follow their guidelines – it makes life easier for everyone involved. You don’t want to be singled out during jurying for not following directions. A file that is 16 inches at its longest dimension with a 72 dpi resolution should be sufficient – that will give you a file size of about 2.5 MB. Check your submission guidelines for image requirements including file size (MB) and type (.jpg, .tif).

Higher resolution is sometimes necessary, but you can’t make a file larger, only smaller. If you only have a 72 dpi image but need it to be 300 dpi, you will need to rephotograph it to get a higher resolution.

Instructions for Photoshop (MAC), and Preview (macOS) are below.

Resizing Images in Photoshop (MAC)

1. Open your image in Photoshop.
2. From menu at top of screen, go to Image > Image Size.

3. Make your changes.

If there is a file size requirement, you can see what that will be in the Image Size window too. Here we reduced the longest dimension by a little over 3″ which reduced the file from 1.75 MB to just over 1 MB.

4. Once your image is the correct size and resolution, go back to the top menu, select File > Save As and save a new version of your file.

JPEGs (.jpg) are standard for low resolution files, while TIFFs (.tif) are recommended for higher resolution.

It’s a good idea to label your file with the relevant info like this example:
Last Name_First Name-Artwork Title-Date-Size.jpg

5. Once your file is labeled and you’ve selected the right file type, choose a destination folder where you want the file to live (or choose Desktop), click Save and you’re done.

Resizing Images in Preview (MAC)

1. Open your image in Preview (the default image viewer of the macOS operating system).
2. From menu at the top of the screen, go to Tools > Adjust Size .

3. Make your changes.

4. Once your image is the correct size and resolution, go back to the top menu, select File > Duplicate.

Choose a file type – JPEGs (.jpg) are standard for low resolution files, while TIFFs (.tif) are recommended for higher resolution.

It’s a good idea to label your file with the relevant info like this example:
Last Name_First Name-Artwork Title-Date-Size.jpg

5. Once your file is labeled and you’ve chosen a destination folder (or Desktop), select the file type you want, click Save and you’re done.

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